College of Engineering News • Iowa State University

Engineers aim to improve oil extraction using acoustic sound waves

Mechanical engineering researchers at Iowa State University are studying ways they can use acoustic sound waves to improve the efficiency of extracting oil from rocks. The project is led by Jaime J. Juárez, assistant professor of mechanical engineering (ME), with additional support from Michael Olsen, professor of ME. The project is supported with a more …Continue reading “Engineers aim to improve oil extraction using acoustic sound waves”

Applying mechanical engineering to pharmaceutical research

Conducting research within the field of pharmaceuticals might be the last place you’d expect to find a mechanical engineer but Michael Olsen would prove you wrong. Olsen, a professor of mechanical engineering (ME) at Iowa State University, is getting ready to begin his newest research project with his colleague Dennis Vigil, professor of chemical and …Continue reading “Applying mechanical engineering to pharmaceutical research”

Mechanical engineering researchers develop new approach for additive manufacturing

A team of mechanical engineering researchers at Iowa State University have developed what they hope can become a new, more efficient method for 3D printing of complex CAD models. Adarsh Krishnamurthy, associate professor of mechanical engineering (ME), is leading the effort with support from ME students Sambit Ghadai and Anushrut Jignasu. The findings from their …Continue reading “Mechanical engineering researchers develop new approach for additive manufacturing”

Researchers measure, model desalination membranes to maximize flow, clean more water

Researchers — including engineers from Iowa State University — have used transmission electron microscopy and 3D computational modeling to quantify and visualize why some desalination membranes work better than others. Their work is featured on the cover of the Jan. 1, 2021, issue of the journal Science.

CoMFRE tackling a vexing droplet research issue with newly designed apparatus

“Predicting breakup is hard to do.” Those are the words of Professor R. Dennis Vigil, an Iowa State University chemical engineering professor. What he’s talking about is the understanding of a vexing research issue: How immiscible droplets of liquid suspended in another liquid (think oil and water) break apart when agitated. It is this knowledge that …Continue reading “CoMFRE tackling a vexing droplet research issue with newly designed apparatus”

Using computer simulations to improve clean energy generation

As the damaging effects of climate change become more apparent, researchers are studying ways to generate energy with minimal impact on the environment. Computer simulations could be the key to making this process more efficient. Shankar Subramaniam, a professor of mechanical engineering at Iowa State University (ISU), is the principal investigator (PI) on a project …Continue reading “Using computer simulations to improve clean energy generation”

Iowa State U, U of Iowa team up on energetic materials research project

Even though the Cyclones and Hawkeyes often duke it out on the field, court and mat, researchers from the two universities have come together to collaborate on a Department of Defense-funded project. The project, titled “3D-Printed, Hierarchical Polymer-Bonded Energetic Composites with Electromagnetically Switchable Porosity,” is being led by principal investigator (PI) Xuan “Sean” Song, assistant …Continue reading “Iowa State U, U of Iowa team up on energetic materials research project”

Engineers find thinner tissues in replacement heart valves create problematic flutter

Iowa State and University of Texas engineers have developed high-fidelity computational models of replacement heart valves to examine the performance of biological tissues built into the valves. They found that thinner tissues can flap and flutter, which can damage the valves and even the blood that flows by.

Simulating, assessing damage to brain cells caused by bubbles during head trauma

Researchers led by Nicole Hashemi, an associate professor of mechanical engineering, are using their expertise with the manufacture of microstructures to study how the collapse of microbubbles within the skull can damage brain cells. Their research, which is supported by the Office of Naval Research, could lead to the design of better helmets.

OpenQBMM software simulates multiphase flow behavior

Alberto Passalacqua, associate professor of mechanical engineering and associate director of the Center for Multiphase Flow Research and Education (CoMFRE), is leading the development of the software OpenQBMM at Iowa State.    OpenQBMM is an open-source multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software designed to simulate the behavior of flows with particles, bubbles, or droplets. …Continue reading “OpenQBMM software simulates multiphase flow behavior”

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