Cyclone Engineering students attend National Conference on Undergraduate Research

Eleven Cyclone Engineering students will share their hands-on research experience with peers from across the country at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research. The annual event, which takes place April 11-13 at Kennesaw State University in Georgia, is the largest undergrad research conference in the nation, with 4,000 students in attendance and featuring networking, professional development and one of the largest graduate school fairs in the U.S.

Engineering students selected to present their research at the conference include:

  • Courtney Beringer, Asbury, mechanical engineering, “Exploring Wearable Technology: Prototyping of Solar Powered Book Bags”
  • Angie Burke, Denver, Iowa, biological systems engineering, “Examining Implications of Climate Change for Food Security in the U.S. Midwest: A Geospatial Analytics Approach”
  • Eric Diaz, Arden Hills, Minnesota, mechanical engineering, “Empathy in Design: How Does a Persona Influence Creativity?”
  • Sehba Faheem, Huntley, Illinois, biological systems engineering, “Course-Based Research: Optimization of L-Lactic Acid Production in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae”
  • Emery Farmer, Strawberry Point, materials engineering, “Development of Copper Based Elastocaloric Materials”
  • Mohamed Gesalla, Ames, electrical engineering, “Identifying Cancerous Images Using Neural Networks”
  • Modeste Kenne, Nevada, computer engineering, “Investigating and Modeling a Network of Embedded Systems”
  • Peiyang Li, Yantai, China, biological systems engineering, “UV Light Treatment of Barn Inlet Air to Mitigate PRRS Transmission”
  • Lucas McPherren, Storm Lake, mechanical engineering, “Effect of Airbrush Attachment Geometry on Speckle Pattern Characteristics for Application with Digital Image Correlation”
  • David Reynolds, Grand Island, Nebraska, mechanical engineering, “The Development of a Microengineered Human Blood Brain-Barrier to Discover the Effects that Xenobiotic Compounds are Having on the Brain’s Blood Stream”
  • Carolyn White, Colleyville, Texas, biological systems engineering; Elke Windschitl, Iowa City, animal ecology; and Kayla Wernsing, Sauk City, Wisconsin, environmental science, “An Experimental Design to Estimate the Number of Milkweed Plants Needed to Support Larval Monarch Butterfly Development”